Sunday, October 28, 2012

People in college/university! Help!

emerycatt:

I’m writing a paper about my school’s security policies. If you could direct me to the website of your school with the section on security/alcohol and drug policies that would be lovely. THAAAANKS.

People in college/university! Help!

I’m writing a paper about my school’s security policies. If you could direct me to the website of your school with the section on security/alcohol and drug policies that would be lovely. THAAAANKS.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012
ikenbot:

Do Psychedelics Expand the Mind by Reducing Brain Activity?
What would you see if you could look inside a hallucinating brain?
New evidence suggests drugs like LSD open the doors of perception by inhibiting parts of the brain
Despite decades of scientific investigation, we still lack a clear understanding of how hallucinogenic drugs such as LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), mescaline, and psilocybin (the main active ingredient in magic mushrooms) work in the brain.
Modern science has demonstrated that hallucinogens activate receptors for serotonin, one of the brain’s key chemical messengers. Specifically, of the 15 different serotonin receptors, the 2A subtype (5-HT2A), seems to be the one that produces profound alterations of thought and perception. It is uncertain, however, why activation of the 5-HT2A receptor by hallucinogens produces psychedelic effects, but many scientists believe that the effects are linked to increases in brain activity.
Although it is not known why this activation would lead to profound alterations of consciousness, one speculation is that an increase in the spontaneous firing of certain types of brain cells leads to altered sensory and perceptual processing, uncontrolled memory retrieval, and the projection of mental “noise” into the mind’s eye.
The English author Aldous Huxley believed that the brain acts as a “reducing valve” that constrains conscious awareness, with mescaline and other hallucinogens inducing psychedelic effects by inhibiting this filtering mechanism. Huxley based this explanation entirely on his personal experiences with mescaline, which was given to him by Humphrey Osmond, the psychiatrist who coined the term psychedelic. Even though Huxley proposed this idea in 1954, decades before the advent of modern brain science, it turns out that he may have been correct. Although the prevailing view has been that hallucinogens work by activating the brain, rather than by inhibiting it as Huxley proposed, the results of a recent imaging study are challenging these conventional explanations.
The study in question was conducted by Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris in conjunction with Professor David Nutt, a psychiatrist who was formerly a scientific advisor to the UK government on drugs policy. Drs. Carhart-Harris, Nutt, and colleagues used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the effects of psilocybin on brain activity in 30 experienced hallucinogen users. In this study, intravenous administration of 2 mg of psilocybin induced a moderately intense psychedelic state that was associated with reductions of neuronal activity in brain regions such as the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC).
The mPFC and ACC are highly interconnected with other brain regions and are believed to be involved in functions such as emotional regulation, cognitive processing, and introspection. Based on their findings, the authors of the study concluded that hallucinogens reduce activity in specific “hub” regions of the brain, potentially diminishing their ability to coordinate activity in downstream brain regions. In effect, psilocybin appears to inhibit brain regions that are responsible for constraining consciousness within the narrow boundaries of the normal waking state, an interpretation that is remarkably similar to what Huxley proposed over half a century ago.

Well you go Alduos Huxley.

ikenbot:

Do Psychedelics Expand the Mind by Reducing Brain Activity?

What would you see if you could look inside a hallucinating brain?

New evidence suggests drugs like LSD open the doors of perception by inhibiting parts of the brain

Despite decades of scientific investigation, we still lack a clear understanding of how hallucinogenic drugs such as LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), mescaline, and psilocybin (the main active ingredient in magic mushrooms) work in the brain.

Modern science has demonstrated that hallucinogens activate receptors for serotonin, one of the brain’s key chemical messengers. Specifically, of the 15 different serotonin receptors, the 2A subtype (5-HT2A), seems to be the one that produces profound alterations of thought and perception. It is uncertain, however, why activation of the 5-HT2A receptor by hallucinogens produces psychedelic effects, but many scientists believe that the effects are linked to increases in brain activity.

Although it is not known why this activation would lead to profound alterations of consciousness, one speculation is that an increase in the spontaneous firing of certain types of brain cells leads to altered sensory and perceptual processing, uncontrolled memory retrieval, and the projection of mental “noise” into the mind’s eye.

The English author Aldous Huxley believed that the brain acts as a “reducing valve” that constrains conscious awareness, with mescaline and other hallucinogens inducing psychedelic effects by inhibiting this filtering mechanism. Huxley based this explanation entirely on his personal experiences with mescaline, which was given to him by Humphrey Osmond, the psychiatrist who coined the term psychedelic. Even though Huxley proposed this idea in 1954, decades before the advent of modern brain science, it turns out that he may have been correct. Although the prevailing view has been that hallucinogens work by activating the brain, rather than by inhibiting it as Huxley proposed, the results of a recent imaging study are challenging these conventional explanations.

The study in question was conducted by Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris in conjunction with Professor David Nutt, a psychiatrist who was formerly a scientific advisor to the UK government on drugs policy. Drs. Carhart-Harris, Nutt, and colleagues used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the effects of psilocybin on brain activity in 30 experienced hallucinogen users. In this study, intravenous administration of 2 mg of psilocybin induced a moderately intense psychedelic state that was associated with reductions of neuronal activity in brain regions such as the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC).

The mPFC and ACC are highly interconnected with other brain regions and are believed to be involved in functions such as emotional regulation, cognitive processing, and introspection. Based on their findings, the authors of the study concluded that hallucinogens reduce activity in specific “hub” regions of the brain, potentially diminishing their ability to coordinate activity in downstream brain regions. In effect, psilocybin appears to inhibit brain regions that are responsible for constraining consciousness within the narrow boundaries of the normal waking state, an interpretation that is remarkably similar to what Huxley proposed over half a century ago.

Well you go Alduos Huxley.

Monday, May 14, 2012

bonedust:

dammit, why didn’t I see these sooner? they would have been great for my co-workers.

Lolllll.

(Source: benkling)

Tuesday, April 3, 2012
Haha, imagine if you’re on some drug that makes you see differently, any drug that it is that you like. Your, ‘drug of choice’ if you will.Now, imagine that the way you perceived everything around you, like how you saw, was how everyone saw you in that moment. What you saw visual distortion-wise, was projected on your face, and your face was distorted equally.Trippy, huh? 

Haha, imagine if you’re on some drug that makes you see differently, any drug that it is that you like. Your, ‘drug of choice’ if you will.
Now, imagine that the way you perceived everything around you, like how you saw, was how everyone saw you in that moment. What you saw visual distortion-wise, was projected on your face, and your face was distorted equally.
Trippy, huh? 

(Source: lowleaf)

Monday, April 2, 2012
Whether drugs lead to illumination or degradation depends on the spirit in which one takes them. George Andrews (via slychedelic)

(Source: heartbloodspirit)

Friday, March 23, 2012
Americans seem to have no problem with drugs, you know, there’s a drug store in every corner. Its the, you know, sort of mind expanding thing that they have a problem with Alex Grey - The spirit molecule documentary  (via youarelookingatit)
Sunday, January 8, 2012
endlessformsmostwonderful:

There are 100 trillion microbes that live in your body. Do you own them? Do they deserve the same protections as your own genes and cells? If someone genetically alters a microbe and claims that if you swallow it, it will let you lose weight, should that living germ be regulated as a drug?

:O

endlessformsmostwonderful:

There are 100 trillion microbes that live in your body. Do you own them? Do they deserve the same protections as your own genes and cells? If someone genetically alters a microbe and claims that if you swallow it, it will let you lose weight, should that living germ be regulated as a drug?

:O

Sunday, January 1, 2012
lonesomelacowboy:

God Grows His Own

Hahahahaha yes.

lonesomelacowboy:

God Grows His Own

Hahahahaha yes.

Friday, December 30, 2011 Wednesday, December 28, 2011
ocelott:

crystal rainbows fill my sky by *aspartamee

This is awesome.
Tuesday, December 27, 2011
allegorys:

Aaron Morse

Kewwwl
lysergiocacid:

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Timothy Francis Leary (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American psychologist and writer, known for his advocacy of psychedelic drugs. During a time when drugs like LSD and psilocybin were legal, Leary conducted experiments at Harvard University under the Harvard Psilocybin Project, resulting in the Concord Prison Experiment and the Marsh Chapel Experiment. Both studies produced useful data, but Leary and his associate Richard Alpert were fired from the university.
Leary argued that psychedelic substances, used at proper dosages, in a stable set and setting could, under the guidance of psychologists, alter behavior in beneficial ways not easily attainable through regular therapy. Leary’s research focused on treating alcoholism and reforming criminals. Many of Leary’s research participants reported profound mystical and spiritual experiences, which they claim permanently altered their lives in a very positive manner. According to Leary’s autobiography, Flashbacks, LSD was given to 300 professors, graduate students, writers and philosophers and 75 percent of the test subjects reported the experience as one of the most educational and revealing experiences of their lives.
During the 1960s and 1970s, Leary was arrested regularly and was held captive in 29 different prisons throughout the world. President Richard Nixon once described Leary as “the most dangerous man in America”. +

The most dangerous man in America, because he could see right through the system.

And he gave LSD to Ken Kesey in these experiments. AND THUS BEGINS THE DESCENT OF THE MERRY PRANKSTERS, “CAN YOU PASS THE ACID TEST?” and following The Greatful Dead like it was their job.

lysergiocacid:

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Timothy Francis Leary (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American psychologist and writer, known for his advocacy of psychedelic drugs. During a time when drugs like LSD and psilocybin were legal, Leary conducted experiments at Harvard University under the Harvard Psilocybin Project, resulting in the Concord Prison Experiment and the Marsh Chapel Experiment. Both studies produced useful data, but Leary and his associate Richard Alpert were fired from the university.

Leary argued that psychedelic substances, used at proper dosages, in a stable set and setting could, under the guidance of psychologists, alter behavior in beneficial ways not easily attainable through regular therapy. Leary’s research focused on treating alcoholism and reforming criminals. Many of Leary’s research participants reported profound mystical and spiritual experiences, which they claim permanently altered their lives in a very positive manner. According to Leary’s autobiography, Flashbacks, LSD was given to 300 professors, graduate students, writers and philosophers and 75 percent of the test subjects reported the experience as one of the most educational and revealing experiences of their lives.

During the 1960s and 1970s, Leary was arrested regularly and was held captive in 29 different prisons throughout the world. President Richard Nixon once described Leary as “the most dangerous man in America”. +

The most dangerous man in America, because he could see right through the system.

And he gave LSD to Ken Kesey in these experiments. AND THUS BEGINS THE DESCENT OF THE MERRY PRANKSTERS, “CAN YOU PASS THE ACID TEST?” and following The Greatful Dead like it was their job.

(Source: consciousnessinthevoid)

onlythedazed:

oh my

Dat luks menacing.

onlythedazed:

oh my

Dat luks menacing.

(Source: abasa)

(Source: artchipel)